curls maketh the fro

(tentacles maketh the octosquiddy)
rhamphotheca:

kevincatalan:  Vampire Squid illustration

My final project from scientific illustration class!! Actualy had a lot of fun doing it and will now be proudly displayed on my girlfriend’s wall. Cheers!

rhamphotheca:

kevincatalanVampire Squid illustration

My final project from scientific illustration class!! Actualy had a lot of fun doing it and will now be proudly displayed on my girlfriend’s wall. Cheers!

(via mad-as-a-marine-biologist)

weirdletter:

The Ghost of Fear and Others: H. P. Lovecraft’s Favorite Horror Stories, Vol. 1, edited by S.T. Joshi, Dark Renaissance Books, 2014. Info: darkrenaissance.com.

'100 signed and numbered trade paperback edition, signed by the editor, S. T. Joshi. H.P. Lovecraft was a voracious reader of supernatural and fantastic fiction, and he was continually on the hunt for powerful and stimulating works in these genres. Many of the stories he read directly influenced his own writings. This first volume of H. P. Lovecraft’s Favorite Horror Stories presents 16 stories that Lovecraft found to be of particular merit. Among them are the beautiful poetic fantasy “Idle Days on the Yann” by Lord Dunsany; Fiona Macleod’s grimly evocative “The Sin-Eater,” which influenced “The Rats in the Walls”; Arthur Machen’s grisly novelette “Novel of the White Powder,” which Lovecraft adapted for “Cool Air”; and M.P. Shiel’s “The House of Sounds,” which Lovecraft ranked among the greatest weird tales ever written. Also included are hard-to-find stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne, E.F. Benson, Théophile Gautier, John Buchan, and others, as well as two stories from the legendary pulp magazine Weird Tales (Seabury Quinn’s “The Phantom Farmhouse” and Arthur J. Burks’s “Bells of Oceana”). The volume contains an introduction by S.T. Joshi as well as notes on the individual stories, giving background on the authors as well as on Lovecraft’s appreciation of the tales and their possible influence on his work.'

Contents:
Introduction by S.T. Joshi
Idle Days on the Yann by Lord Dunsany
Fragments from the Journal of a Solitary Man by Nathaniel Hawthorne
The Man Who Went Too Far by E.F. Benson
The Mark of the Beast by Rudyard Kipling
The Sin-Eater by Fiona Macleod
The House of Sounds by M.P. Shiel
The Phantom Farmhouse by Seabury Quinn
One of Cleopatra’s Nights by Théophile Gautier
The Stranger from Kurdistan by E. Hoffmann Price
The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar by Edgar Allan Poe
Novel of the White Powder by Arthur Machen
The Dead Smile by F. Marion Crawford
The Ghost of Fear by H.G. Wells
Lukundoo by Edward Lucas White
Bells of Oceana by Arthur J. Burks
The Wind in the Portico by John Buchan

weirdletter:

The Ghost of Fear and Others: H. P. Lovecraft’s Favorite Horror Stories, Vol. 1, edited by S.T. Joshi, Dark Renaissance Books, 2014. Info: darkrenaissance.com.

'100 signed and numbered trade paperback edition, signed by the editor, S. T. Joshi. H.P. Lovecraft was a voracious reader of supernatural and fantastic fiction, and he was continually on the hunt for powerful and stimulating works in these genres. Many of the stories he read directly influenced his own writings. This first volume of H. P. Lovecraft’s Favorite Horror Stories presents 16 stories that Lovecraft found to be of particular merit. Among them are the beautiful poetic fantasy “Idle Days on the Yann” by Lord Dunsany; Fiona Macleod’s grimly evocative “The Sin-Eater,” which influenced “The Rats in the Walls”; Arthur Machen’s grisly novelette “Novel of the White Powder,” which Lovecraft adapted for “Cool Air”; and M.P. Shiel’s “The House of Sounds,” which Lovecraft ranked among the greatest weird tales ever written. Also included are hard-to-find stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne, E.F. Benson, Théophile Gautier, John Buchan, and others, as well as two stories from the legendary pulp magazine Weird Tales (Seabury Quinn’s “The Phantom Farmhouse” and Arthur J. Burks’s “Bells of Oceana”). The volume contains an introduction by S.T. Joshi as well as notes on the individual stories, giving background on the authors as well as on Lovecraft’s appreciation of the tales and their possible influence on his work.'

Contents:
Introduction by S.T. Joshi
Idle Days on the Yann by Lord Dunsany
Fragments from the Journal of a Solitary Man by Nathaniel Hawthorne
The Man Who Went Too Far by E.F. Benson
The Mark of the Beast by Rudyard Kipling
The Sin-Eater by Fiona Macleod
The House of Sounds by M.P. Shiel
The Phantom Farmhouse by Seabury Quinn
One of Cleopatra’s Nights by Théophile Gautier
The Stranger from Kurdistan by E. Hoffmann Price
The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar by Edgar Allan Poe
Novel of the White Powder by Arthur Machen
The Dead Smile by F. Marion Crawford
The Ghost of Fear by H.G. Wells
Lukundoo by Edward Lucas White
Bells of Oceana by Arthur J. Burks
The Wind in the Portico by John Buchan

kazard:

residentfeline:

how do cats even work

Cats:
A cat can jump up to five times its own height in a single bound.
The little tufts of hair in a cat’s ear that help keep out dirt direct sounds into the ear, and insulate the ears are called “ear furnishings.”
The ability of a cat to find its way home is called “psi-traveling.” Experts think cats either use the angle of the sunlight to find their way or that cats have magnetized cells in their brains that act as compasses.
One reason that kittens sleep so much is because a growth hormone is released only during sleep.
A cat has 230 bones in its body. A human has 206. A cat has no collarbone, so it can fit through any opening the size of its head.
A cat’s nose pad is ridged with a unique pattern, just like the fingerprint of a human.
If they have ample water, cats can tolerate temperatures up to 133 °F.
A cat’s heart beats nearly twice as fast as a human heart, at 110 to 140 beats a minute.
 Cats don’t have sweat glands over their bodies like humans do. Instead, they sweat only through their paws.
The claws on the cat’s back paws aren’t as sharp as the claws on the front paws because the claws in the back don’t retract and, consequently, become worn.
Cats make about 100 different sounds. Dogs make only about 10.
Researchers are unsure exactly how a cat purrs. Most veterinarians believe that a cat purrs by vibrating vocal folds deep in the throat. To do this, a muscle in the larynx opens and closes the air passage about 25 times per second.
A cat almost never meows at another cat, mostly just humans. Cats typically will spit, purr, and hiss at other cats.
A cat’s back is extremely flexible because it has up to 53 loosely fitting vertebrae. Humans only have 34.
Some cats have survived falls of over 65 feet (20 meters), due largely to their “righting reflex.” The eyes and balance organs in the inner ear tell it where it is in space so the cat can land on its feet. Even cats without a tail have this ability.
A cat can travel at a top speed of approximately 31 mph (49 km) over a short distance.
A cat’s hearing is better than a dog’s. And a cat can hear high-frequency sounds up to two octaves higher than a human.
A cat’s brain is biologically more similar to a human brain than it is to a dog’s. Both humans and cats have identical regions in their brains that are responsible for emotions.
And that’s how cats work.


……. Aaaaaaaaand they are the reincarnation of ancient kung fu masters.

kazard:

residentfeline:

how do cats even work

Cats:

  • A cat can jump up to five times its own height in a single bound.
  • The little tufts of hair in a cat’s ear that help keep out dirt direct sounds into the ear, and insulate the ears are called “ear furnishings.”
  • The ability of a cat to find its way home is called “psi-traveling.” Experts think cats either use the angle of the sunlight to find their way or that cats have magnetized cells in their brains that act as compasses.
  • One reason that kittens sleep so much is because a growth hormone is released only during sleep.
  • A cat has 230 bones in its body. A human has 206. A cat has no collarbone, so it can fit through any opening the size of its head.
  • A cat’s nose pad is ridged with a unique pattern, just like the fingerprint of a human.
  • If they have ample water, cats can tolerate temperatures up to 133 °F.
  • A cat’s heart beats nearly twice as fast as a human heart, at 110 to 140 beats a minute.
  •  Cats don’t have sweat glands over their bodies like humans do. Instead, they sweat only through their paws.
  • The claws on the cat’s back paws aren’t as sharp as the claws on the front paws because the claws in the back don’t retract and, consequently, become worn.
  • Cats make about 100 different sounds. Dogs make only about 10.
  • Researchers are unsure exactly how a cat purrs. Most veterinarians believe that a cat purrs by vibrating vocal folds deep in the throat. To do this, a muscle in the larynx opens and closes the air passage about 25 times per second.
  • A cat almost never meows at another cat, mostly just humans. Cats typically will spit, purr, and hiss at other cats.
  • A cat’s back is extremely flexible because it has up to 53 loosely fitting vertebrae. Humans only have 34.
  • Some cats have survived falls of over 65 feet (20 meters), due largely to their “righting reflex.” The eyes and balance organs in the inner ear tell it where it is in space so the cat can land on its feet. Even cats without a tail have this ability.
  • A cat can travel at a top speed of approximately 31 mph (49 km) over a short distance.
  • A cat’s hearing is better than a dog’s. And a cat can hear high-frequency sounds up to two octaves higher than a human.
  • A cat’s brain is biologically more similar to a human brain than it is to a dog’s. Both humans and cats have identical regions in their brains that are responsible for emotions.

And that’s how cats work.

……. Aaaaaaaaand they are the reincarnation of ancient kung fu masters.

(Source: caturday, via eduardo-)